FTL Primer

The original FTL drive system developed is referred to as the ‘Linear FTL Drive’, though later researchers from Ceres developed the first ‘Non-linear FTL Drive’. Both systems have pros and cons. Work continues for other methods as well and even advances in the two existing systems as people try to fix the limitations of current systems.

Linear FTL

Linear FTL is related to the Alcubierre drive concept and so sometimes referred to as a ‘Warp Drive’.

  • Advantages
    • The key advantage to Linear FTL is that the fields last as long as power is applied to the systems.
  • Disadvantages
    • Linear FTL is in a relatively straight line without ‘stopping’ in relative terms.
  • Measurement
    • Linear FTL is measured in light years per unit of time.
    • Modern systems are measured in light years per month (so a 1 ly/m drive is moving 12 times the relative speed of light).

Non-linear FTL

Non-linear FTL is related to the Einstein–Rosen bridge concept which makes use of Gravitic technology and Casimir effect manipulation. They are also sometimes called ‘Fold Drives’ or ‘Jump Drives’.

  • Advantages
    • Non-linear FTL drives don’t need to travel in a straight line, but any single jump is limited by the amount of power given to fuel it.
  • Disadvantages
    • Jumps under 1 light year are exceedingly difficult if not outright impossible (The system just can’t tell ‘there’ from ‘here’).
  • Measurement
    • Non-linear FTL is measured in distance traveled in a single ‘jump’.

Universal Issues

All current FTL methods of both types have several issues.

  • Strong gravity fields, such as the ones that cover all solar systems, so to use the drive you have to ‘exit’ the solar system proper.

FTL Primer

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